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PALMER, Jacob T., stock dealer and farmer, Bellmore, was born November20, 1846 in Clinton Co IN and is the son of Prentice T. and Ella BORN (DAZEY) Palmer.  His father was born in NY and mother in PA.  He was educated in Ladoga, IN high school.  He was raised on a farm and has been familiar with stock from his childhood.  When 3 he removed with his parents to Montgomery Co IN and in 1867 to Parke Co; in 1875 moved to Edgar County, ILL and in 1878 back to Parke County, where he has since been engaged in the stock business, in connection with William P. SWAIM, owning one-half interest in the stables and stock of Swaim and Palmer.  He also farms quite largely.  ON February 4, 1863, he enlisted in Co H 40th Ind. Vols. and was mustered in at Indianapolis.  He participated in most of the battles of the regiment, taking part in 9 engagements.  He was under fire on the Atlanta campaign 77 days continually.  When Sherman left Atlanta, Mr. Palmer marched with his regiment under Thomas again Hood, and participated in the battles of Columbia, Franklin and Nashville. He was discharged July 1865 at New Orleans, La.  He was twice wounded, once by a shell and once by a minnie-ball, but never reported for hospital.  He is republican in principles.  He was married October2, 1867 to Melinda J. WARE, daughter of James P. and Mary A (DOWNEY) Ware.  They have 6 children: Cora A; Minnie J; Thera O; Ora J; Mollie C. and Ethie J. - Unknown Source

 

PARENT, William K, farmer, Sylvania, is a native of Kentucky, born in Hardin Co.  He is the son of David and Jane (AWBREY) Parent; his father died in 1844 and his mother is still living and continues to reside in Kentucky.   In 1852 Mr. Parent moved to IN, locating in Parke County, where he resided for 6 years, when in 1858, he removed to Eugene Township, Vermilion Co.  in 1865 he enlisted in the 149th Indiana Regiment, Co. E and served until the close of the war, when he ret. to Eugene, where he continued to reside until the spring of1869, when he ret. again to Parke Co. and settled on his present location, where he has a good farm of 80 acres, well improved and in a good state of cultivation.  In July, 1856, he was married to Miss Elizabeth A. STANTON, daughter of Solomon BORN Stanton, one of the pioneers of Liberty Township.  They have a family of 3 boys and one girl; David, Jane, John and Perley.  Mr. Parent is a leading member of the AF & AM and in politics is strongly republican.  Taken from: The 1880 History of Parke County, Indiana.  J. H.  Beadle.   Chicago: H. H. Hill

 

PARTLOW, John W., physician and surgeon, Bellmore, was born in Parke co IN June 28, 1845 and is the son of Jesse and Mary A (GOODWIN) Partlow, for many years residents of Union Township.  He finished a course of study in the Bryant & Stratton Commercial College at Indianapolis, IN and engaged in a mercantile business at Bellemore.  During the time in which he was in business he began the study of medicine, and graduated in 1879 from the Medical College of Indiana at Indianapolis.  He now devotes all his time to his practicing, being settled at Bellemore.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.  Politically he is a republican.  October15, 1879 he married Miss Anna M. CLARK of Bainbridge Indiana.  He is a pleasant gentleman and will gradually build up a business.  - Unknown Source

 

PATTERSON, James, oldest son of Arthur and Jane Patterson, was born in Claybourn County, MS in 1804.  When James was six months old they moved to Virginia, going 1600 miles on horseback.  In 1824 the family settled in Rockville.  For the next 20 years James, being of a roving disposition, lived in nearly every part of the Union, engaging in various kinds of business.  Part of the time he was a Capt. on an Ohio  River steamboat.  In 1845 he settled in Armiesburg, where he ran the flouring mill and conducted a general store until he retired a few years before his death, which occurred there several years ago.  His brother, Chambers Y. Patterson became a good lawyer and was several years Judge of a Circuit composed of Parke, Vermillion, Vigo and Sullivan Counties. - Unknown Source

Albert PAYNE, one of the leading attorneys of Brazil, Clay County and a man of thoroughly disciplined mind and strong character is a striking example of the American citizen who has attained a substantial position in his community without the aid of a broad education obtained within the walls of the school room.  At the age of 14, family circumstances were such that left the school room as a pupil forever, and since that time his career has been a manly and successful struggle for self improvement and honorable self advancement.  Mr. Payne was born Jackson Township, Clay County, Indiana  on 26 December 1855 a son of Bennett and Ellen McCullough Payne. The father was a native of Bowling Green Kentucky born June 6, 1825 and who died 22 July 1903.  The mother was born at Bull's Gap, Tennessee on 23 September 1825 and died July 22, 1897. Their marriage occurred in Washington Township, Putnam County, Indiana February 1849. Bennett Payne came to Indiana in 1830, being then a child of five years, accompanied by his parents and grandparents.  His parents and grandparents on both sides were raised amid the environments of slavery in Kentucky and came to Indiana at this early date to escape the blighting effects of slavery. The household goods were conveyed into the Hoosier state on pack horses and the first family homestead was fixed at a locality a short distance north of Poland in Clay County.  In this wilderness Bennett Payne developed into a sturdy frontiersman, married and built a log house and reared a family to the useful and steadfast ways of the typical Christian pioneer. The father was a cooper by trade, and a general mechanic of fine ability and was one of the first men in Clay County to engage in the block coal business.  He also cultivated and developed a farm of 80 acres and was in many ways a man of remarkable versatility in practical achievements. During all his life he was an earnest and active member of the Predestination Baptist Church.  In politics he was an ardent Whig, his nativity and family influences from his earliest recollections, welding him to the party to the personality of its great leader, the brilliant Kentuckian Henry Clay. As a boy, Albert Payne assisted his father in his coal mining operation but with the acquirements of sufficient schooling he himself commenced to teach in Clay and Vigo counties and continued in the educational field for 13 years.  Notwithstanding his lack of normal training, his success was a so unqualified that the last two years of his career as a pedagogue were spent as principal of the Lambert School at Brazil.  He then spent a summer in farming and recuperating and in 1888 was admitted to practice at the Indiana bar at Brazil. The succeeding 12 years were occupied chiefly in various lines of business at Brazil and in 1900 removed to his farm in Perry Township, Clay County which he conducted until September 1, 1904. On the latter date he reentered the practice of law again at Brazil which has been both profitable and most creditable to his professional ability.  Among his professional associates he is known as an active member of the County Bar Association and has an influential connection with the following fraternities: Brazil Lodge, NO 264 AF & AM (past master); Brazil Chapter No 59, RAM (present high priest); Brazil Council No. 40 R & SM and Brazil Commandery, No. 47 KT.  Both Mr. Payne and his wife are very prominent in the work of William black Chapter No 8 Order of the Eastern Star of which the former is past worthy patron and the latter past worthy matron.  They are also both leaders in the work of the Methodist Church. On 22 February 1880, Mr. Payne was united in wedlock with Emma A. NEVINS who was born near Rockville, Parke County Indiana on 13 September 1859.  She is a daughter of David M. and Margaret Adams Nevins, the father born in Parke County, Indiana mother in Kentucky.  Mrs. Payne’s grandfather, Henry Nevins settled in Parke County in 1817and served with General Harrison in several of his Indian campaigns.  The parents of Mrs. Payne were married in Parke County, Indiana in 1852 and 5 of their 8 children are alive: Ellen wife of EM Liston; Emma, Mrs. Albert Payne; Amanda now Mrs. Reuben Brown; Clara who married William O. Richey; and Sarah wife of Clifford Elliott. David m. Nevins is a Baptist minister who has spent his life in forwarding the work of his church in Vigo and Parke Counties and is now a resident of Blackhawk in the former county.  He lost his first wife by death his present helpmate being known before marriage as Sarah McGruce. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Payne have become parents of 8 of whom 3 are living: Warren E who is now in the practice of law with his father (graduate of Brazil High School and admitted to the bar on his 21st birthday, he being the youngest attorney admitted in Clay County); Reynolds G who is a midshipman in the US Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, representing the 5th Congressional district of Indiana and Oran.  Allen R, who died at age 23 served in the Spanish-American war as a member of Company F 159th Regt Indiana Volunteers  - Travis, William.  A history of Clay County, Indiana.  New York: Lewis Publishing Company, 1909, Page 85 

PAYTON, James F. , farmer, Parkville, a pioneer of Green Township, was born in Mason County, Kentucky in 1825; at the age of two and a half years came to Parke Co. With his parents.  He is the son of Antony and Margret (WOLLINGFORD) Payton; his father was a Virginian and his mother a native of Kentucky.  James Payton's grandfather, Thomas Payton, was an associate and playmate of General Washington.  He carried the colors throughout the revolutionary war, and hands down to us, through his son James F, the "hatchet story" as an undeniable fact, not a myth, as some would have it.  James F. Was married in 1847 to Elizabeth RUSH, daughter of Abraham and Mary (MADIX) Rush.  She is a native of Indiana, and came to this county with her parents in 1829.  By this married he has five children: John A, married to Lucinda JOHNSON; Sarah, Lucinda F to Daniel SWIM; Matilda; Libbie.  Mr. Payton and his wife are members of the Predestinarian Baptist church, at Mt. Moriah of which he is one of the present deacons.  Their parents held to the same faith.  He never held any public offices.  He is a member of the democratic party.  He began life poor, and by his industry has made himself the owner of 115 acres of good land, which he has in good cultivation, and well stocked.  Taken from: The 1880 History of Parke County, Indiana.  J. H.  Beadle.   Chicago: H. H. Hill)

 

PAYTON,  James F. was born in Mason Co Kentucky in 1825.  His parents settled in Greene Township in 1828.  His grandfather, Thomas Payton was an associate and playmate of George Washington and served in the Revolutionary War.  He was married in 1847 to Elizabeth RUSH a daughter of Abraham Rush who came to this county with her parent sin 1829.  Mr. Payton and his wife were members of Mt. Moriah Baptist church.  He was a good citizen and successful farmer.  (Taken from: Atlas Map of Parke Co IN.  By AT Andreas.  Chicago: Lakeside Building for Clark & Adams St, 1874

Thomas PAYTON, one of the well-to-do and enterprising agriculturists of Greene Township, Parke County, owns a substantial residence, which he erected at a cost of about $3,000 on his fine farm, which is situated on Section 21.  He is engaged in mixed farming, keeps a first-class variety of stock of all kinds, raises thorough-bred Poland-China hogs and has some very good horses.  Mr. Payton is much interested in the success of the Democratic Party, has filled the office of Committeeman of the township and has been a delegate to the state and also to Congressional conventions.  The paternal grandfather of our subject grew up with General Washington.  He was a soldier in the War of the Revolution taking part in nearly all the battles and was an officer under the great commander, who was his personal friend.  He was a man of more than usual ability and intelligence, pursuing the avocation of a school teacher the greater part of his life, and died shortly after the demise of General Washington.  Our subject's father, Anthony was born in the Old Dominion in 1801, and removed with his parents to Kentucky in his early youth.  In that state he married Miss Margaret, daughter of Mark Wallingford, who was an early settler of the Blue Grass region.  To this worthy couple, were born 4 children while in Kentucky and in 1828 the family removed to Indiana, settling in Greene Township on Section 22 where the father rented a farm for 4 years. In 1831 he located near Bellmore, in Union Township, where he entered land. He was one of the first settlers of the township, and he at once commenced piling brush and clearing a place to raise food for his family and so diligently did he work that before the spring had passed 5 acres were ready for the seed.  Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Payton in this county.  Only 4 of the family are living: Mrs. Juliana Lewis of Boone County, James F, a resident of Greene Township, John L, of Sullivan County and our subject.  The father, who was a member of the Predestinarian Baptist Church died in October 1853.  His wife, who held the same faith, survived her husband nearly half a century, her death occurring in December, 1882.  Mr. Payton was a strong Democrat, and actively interested in the welfare of this region, to the development of which he contributed to no small measure.  Thomas Payton was educated in the public schools of Parke County where his birth occurred 12 May 1832.  He lived with his father, until his marriage on May 6, 1852 with Miss Martha Ann Stout who was born in Kentucky September 12, 1833.  Her father, James Stout emigrated to this state from the Blue Grass region in 1834, locating in Union Township, where he resided until his death in May 1889.  He entered land of the government, opened up a farm and in time became the owner of several hundred acres.  His wife was formerly Rhoda Maddox, and by her marriage she became the mother of 7 children: those living: Mrs. Payton; Mary Jane Connolly, who lives in Union Township, William P and James O who lived in the same place, Sarah E (deceased) and Rebecca F, Mrs. John A. Rush, who lives in Iowa.  After his marriage, Mr. Payton located in Union Township, where he rented land for 5 years and then purchased 100 acres in the same township. This was in 1858 and he at once moved to the farm on which he lived for 7 years, then removing to his present farm.  At first he owned 120 acres of this place, to which in 1875 he added 50 more.  For about 30 years he has been engaged in carrying on this far, which his now one of the most desirable of the township.  Mr. Payton is a man of considerable mechanical genius and in August 1891, he constructed an appliance which, by means of a hydraulic ram and tanks, furnished water for his stock in all parts of the farm.  Of 10 children of our subject, 8 still survive.  James A is a fruit grower, raising lemons, and oranges in California and is doing well.  Mary F, is the wife of Jacob Collings, who lives in this township; William H lives in New Market; Sarah J wife of Robert Laffollete, lives near Raccoon Station, Montgomery County; Nancy J, wife of Samuel W. Jarvis, a farmer lives in Putnam County; Ella lives at home and has taught music for six years, prior to which she pursued her musical education for two years at Terre Haute, under Prof. Zobel; Ora is attending the commercial college at Terre Haute and is preparing for a mercantile life and Homer, now 16 lives at home and will graduate form the public schools.  The two deceased children of our subject are George W, died about one year and John A, whose death occurred when 10.  The pleasant home of the Payton family is one of the best in the county and, unlike the usually residence of farmers, is throughly warmed in all parts of the building during the winter season.  Mr. Payton is a member of the predestinarian Baptist Church, attending Mount Moriah Chapel, to which his wife also belongs.  He is quite a musician and leads the singing of the choir.  It is safe to say that few men in this region are more honored and respected than is the gentleman of whom this is a brief record.   - Portrait & Biographical Record of Montgomery, Parke & Fountain Counties, Indiana. Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1893, Page 605

PAXTON, Sarah E., Bellmore, is the daughter of Ely L. and America CLARK and was born March 12, 1845 in Parke Co., Indiana.  She was educated in the common schools.  Her youth and early womanhood were passed at home.  October9, 1871 she was married to r. William P. Paxton, Bellmore.  Mr. Paxton had practiced in Union and adjoining townships for many years and was quite eminent in his profession.  He freely gave advice to the young, urging them to educational efforts.  He waited on rich and poor alike, and so extensive did his practice become that he became worn and broken in health.  He was obliged to retire and at Rockville where he and his family, Mrs. Paxton an daughter Mary, were living he died January 18, 1873.  He is buried near Judson, Parke Co., a handsome marble monument standing at the head of his grave.  Mr. Paxton graduated from the Louisville (Kentucky) Medical College in 1845, and died at the age of 74 years.  With Mrs. Paxton he was a member of the Christian church.  Mary, their only child, was born October21, 1872 and died August 18, 1879, and is bur. near her father.  She was a sweet child and loved by her parents.  Mrs. Paxton still lives in Bellmore, comfortably provided for by her husband before his death.   - Unknown Source

 

PEARSON, Pearly , farmer, Bloomingdale, was born in Penn Township, Parke Co IN March 20, 1830.  He is the son of William and Mary Anderson Pearson.  His father, William, was born in SC June 19, 1786 and died in Iowa in 1867 and his mother was born in 1796 and died1865.  Mr. Pearson's parents came from Miami County, Ohio  to Parke Co in 1828 and settled on the farm now owned by Mr. Pearson.   He has been a resident of Parke Co all his life, with the exception of 3 years and a half which time he spent in Fountain County, IN.  In 1851 he was joined in marriage to Miss EE DUCK, daughter of James and Susanah Duck of Edgar Co IL.  They have 14 children, of whom 11 are living: Susan E, wife of J. LINEBARGER; Mary A; Albert A; Oliver E; Clara I; Nora L; Horace F; Charlie G; Flora B; Perley F; and Cloyd W.  Mr. Pearson is the owner of a fine farm containing 470 acres, which is the fruit of many years' hard work and the result of the help of a self-denying wife, who is always ready to lend a helping hand.  Mr. Pearson and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Pearson is a member of the Masonic fraternity and in politics is a Republican.   Taken from: Page289 History of Parke Co IN; J. H.  Beadle, Chicago: H. H. Hill, 1880

John PENCE.  This prominent resident of Raccoon Township, Parke County was born January 9, 1833 near Eaton, which is the county seat of Preble County, Ohio.  He was the youngest of 3 brothers and the next to the youngest of a family of 8 children.  Phoebe, the eldest married Thomas Fudge and since his death has made her home with a daughter in Morgan County Indiana.  Nimrod married Elizabeth Keeling and died at the old homestead about 1887, leaving a large family of children, all of whom remain in Ohio.  Lucinda became the wife of William Rissinger, of Preble County Ohio.  Daniel married Catherine Fudge and died in Preble Co about 1860. Rebecca, Mrs. Joseph Crain, resides near Lebanon, Warren County Ohio.  Rachel married Edward Crain (sic - Crane according to census) and they also make their home in Warren County, Ohio.  Mary, the youngest child, married Asa Riggs and died in Vermillion County Indiana about 1881.  The parents of this family were Henry and Mary Harshman Pence.  The father was born in Rockingham County Virginia about 1784 and was one of 3 brothers, Peter, William and Henry.  The grandfather of our subject, John Pence, was born in Virginia and there he died in 1822 at an advanced age. The Pence family is of German Extraction, but it is not known how far back the family history dates in neither this country, nor the name of the first emigrant across the broad Atlantic.  Grandfather Pence was a large planter and slave-owner in the old Dominion, and after his death his 3 sons went to Butler County Ohio and later made settlement in Preble County, where they all survived to a good old age.  Near the close of the War of 1812 the father of our subject enlisted, but the war coming to an end, he saw no active service.  The early members of the pence family were all Lutherans in religious belief and were sturdy, upright men, but of limited education.  The Harshman family was an old Virginia family and of German descent. The mother of our subject was born in Old Dominion about 1797 and died in Preble County, Ohio in January 1842.  Her father was a planter and slave-holder in Virginia as was her brother, Jerry who also enlisted in the War of 1812 but saw no active warfare. Her father died in Virginia.  Her mother died in Parke County, Indiana.  In religious belief they were ardent supporters of the doctrines of the Lutheran Church.  John Pence, our subject, grew to manhood on his father's farm and received but a limited common school education.  In 1856, in Hoi, he married Miss Mary Agnes Gilpin, who was born in Clinton County Ohio a daughter of Joseph and Phoebe Swerer Gilpin.  Her grandfather Gilpin was an Irishman by birth but early in life came to this country and die din Clinton County Ohio.  The Swerer family is of German extraction and some of the members early settled in New Jersey.  The grandfather of Mrs. Pence came to Butler County Ohio in an early day and died in Preble County at age 85.  The father of Mrs. Pence died when she was only 2, leaving two children, Mary Agnes and Enos.  The latter was a soldier in the late war and was taken prisoner and confined at Libby.  The mother of Mrs. Pence married again and after the death of her second husband made her home with our subject, where she died in 1882. The Gilpines were all Quakers, and a brother of the father of Mrs. Pence, Henry by name was a prominent Quaker preacher.  The religious sympathies of the Swerer family were with the Christian Church.  Mr. Pence continued to live in Ohio until 1859 when he came to Parke County and first settled in Adams Township.  Later he purchased a farm in Raccoon Township, adjoining the town of Catlin where he lived until 2 years ago. He then, in 1891, formed a partnership with M. H. Case in the stock business and assumed the management of Mr. Case's 800 acre farm, located near Bridgeton.  So far as we can trace, the pence family have always adhered to Democratic principles, and John is no exception tot he rule.  Socially, he is a Mason.  He and his wife are members of the Christian Church and he has served as Elder for many years.  Seven children have been born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Pence.  William married Maggie Ernest, and is now a merchant in Catlin.  He received an excellent education at Terre Haute, and engaged in teach school 5 years.  Thomas married Mattie McLain and resides on the farm with his father. The other children: Mary; Charlie; Elmer; Frank and Daniel.  The position occupied by the family in social circles is one of prominence and influence and they are highly regarded throughout the community. - Portrait & Biographical Record of Montgomery, Parke & Fountain Counties, Indiana.  Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1893, Page 522

Aaron PENCE, Terre Haute, blacksmith is the son of Peter and Margaret NEWELL Pence, who were natives of Ohio and of German-Irish descent.  They came west in 1834 and located in Parke County Indiana and became one of the prominent families of that county. Soon after they came to that county they purchased a farm on which they resided until their deaths.  Mr. Pence died October 15, 1877 and Mrs. Pence 1867.  Aaron was born in Parke County December 25, 1836 and resided with his parents attending school from 30-40 days in the winter and working on the farm in the summer. This he continued until 16 and then went to Rockville in the same county and served an apprenticeship, learning the blacksmith's trade which he completed at 19 years of age.  The spot where he learned the trade is now marked by a church.  December 31, 1857 Mr. Pence took a life partner, his choice being Miss Caroline WITHAM daughter of Thomas and Sarah Witham who were natives of Kentucky and Maryland.  March 24, 1846 Mr. Witham died.  Mrs. Witham now resides in this county (Vigo).  Mr. Pence came to Vigo in 1861 and located on LaFayette Rd 5 miles north of Terre Haute, where he has been engaged in his former occupation, that of blacksmith. Being a competent workman and dealing honestly with his many customers, he has not only secured a large patronage but a wide circle of friends. - Beckwith, H. W.  History of Vigo and Parke Counties.  Chicago: H.H. Hill and N. Iddings, 1880, Page 506

William R. PENCE is the senior member of the enterprising firm of Pence & Gray, general merchandise, grain, poultry and produce dealers of Catlin, Parke County and was born February 19, 1860 in this county.  He is the son of John & Agnes E. GILPIN Pence, of Preble Co Ohio who came to Parke County in 1859.  Mr. Pence has always followed the vocation of a farmer and is considered one of the representatives of his class.  This worthy gentleman and wife are the parents of 7 children, six sons and one daughter: Thomas; Charles; Elmer; Frank; Alva; he of whom we write and Miss Mary, who yet lives under the parental roof.  The youthful day of our subject were spent after the manner of farmer lads, working on the farm and going to school.  He completed his education at the Normal School at Danville Indiana and Terre Haute, Indiana. While at the former place he met Lawrence O. GRAY who was also attending school and who is now the junior member of the firm.  This co-partnership is the culmination of strong ties of friendship formed by these two young men during their college days. For a biography of Mr. Gray see another page of this work.  At the age of 20 Mr. Pence began his first day of school teaching in the public schools of this county and continued in this work for five years with the best of success.  To the regret of his patrons and many pupils, he retired from this field of labor to enter into the business world by purchasing the small and shelf-worn stock of goods of George W. HANSEL of Catlin this county. For these goods he paid $750 and at once commenced to cater to the demands of the public. Through his business tact and talent he soon discovered that his stock of goods was incomplete in variety as well as quantity and he at once began adding to his diminishing stock a well-selected and larger assortment of general merchandise.  As his stock increased so did his trade until he was forced to increase his storeroom, which he did by erecting a fine, modern-style and substantial building, 30 x 85 feet in dimensions, which he at once filled with goods that will now invoice over $5,000. January 1, 1892, these two young men formed their present co-partnership and from that date have filled a long-felt want of the many farmers of their section, namely: that of a market where they could dispose advantageously of their grain, produce and poultry.  For these commodities this firm pays the highest cash prices that the condition of the market of the cities will warrant them in doing.  They dress all their poultry and ship many thousand pounds of it annually.  Their grain shipments in 1892 were large, more than had been shipped from this place for years.  March 31, 1887, was the nuptial day of Mr. Pence and Miss Margaret ERNEST, the only daughter and living child of William and Mahala ERNST, natives of Pennsylvania, but residents of Catlin. Mrs. Pence had two brothers, Oliver and Albert. The former died at the age of 16 and the latter was killed by the exposition of a boiler in a mill when but 17.  Both were promising young men. Mrs. Pence was born November 1, 1868 and is a woman of bright intellectual qualifications as well as domestic ability.  A lady of fine conversational talent, sociable and agreeable, she is closely allied with the Christian Church of which she is a consistent member. She is the mother of two daughters, Lola M, born May 8, 1889, and Ruby born June 27,1891.  Mr. Pence held the office of Postmaster for two years under President Cleveland's administration which position he filled in a trustworthy manner.  He is an energetic Democrat and was prominently identified with the conventions during the last presidential campaign.  Socially, he is one of those gentlemen always ready to make everybody happy, and at his home a stranger as well as his friends finds a ready welcome. -  Portrait & Biographical Record of Montgomery, Parke & Fountain Counties, Indiana, Page 319

William R. PENCE is the senior member of the enterprising firm of Pence & Gray, general merchandise, grain, poultry and produce dealers of Catlin, Parke County and was born February 19, 1860 in this county.  He is the son of John & Agnes E. GILPIN Pence, of Preble Co Ohio who came to Parke County in 1859.  Mr. Pence has always followed the vocation of a farmer and is considered one of the representatives of his class.  This worthy gentleman and wife are the parents of 7 children, six sons and one daughter: Thomas; Charles; Elmer; Frank; Alva; he of whom we write and Miss Mary, who yet lives under the parental roof.  The youthful day of our subject were spent after the manner of farmer lads, working on the farm and going to school.  He completed his education at the Normal School at Danville Indiana and Terre Haute, Indiana. While at the former place he met Lawrence O. GRAY who was also attending school and who is now the junior member of the firm.  This co-partnership is the culmination of strong ties of friendship formed by these two young men during their college days. For a biography of Mr. Gray see another page of this work.  At the age of 20 Mr. Pence began his first day of school teaching in the public schools of this county and continued in this work for five years with the best of success.  To the regret of his patrons and many pupils, he retired from this field of labor to enter into the business world by purchasing the small and shelf-worn stock of goods of George W. HANSEL of Catlin this county. For these goods he paid $750 and at once commenced to cater to the demands of the public. Through his business tact and talent he soon discovered that his stock of goods was incomplete in variety as well as quantity and he at once began adding to his diminishing stock a well-selected and larger assortment of general merchandise.  As his stock increased so did his trade until he was forced to increase his storeroom, which he did by erecting a fine, modern-style and substantial building, 30 x 85 feet in dimensions, which he at once filled with goods that will now invoice over $5,000. January 1, 1892, these two young men formed their present co-partnership and from that date have filled a long-felt want of the many farmers of their section, namely: that of a market where they could dispose advantageously of their grain, produce and poultry.  For these commodities this firm pays the highest cash prices that the condition of the market of the cities will warrant them in doing.  They dress all their poultry and ship many thousand pounds of it annually.  Their grain shipments in 1892 were large, more than had been shipped from this place for years.  March 31, 1887, was the nuptial day of Mr. Pence and Miss Margaret ERNEST, the only daughter and living child of William and Mahala ERNST, natives of Pennsylvania, but residents of Catlin. Mrs. Pence had two brothers, Oliver and Albert. The former died at the age of 16 and the latter was killed by the exposition of a boiler in a mill when but 17.  Both were promising young men. Mrs. Pence was born November 1, 1868 and is a woman of bright intellectual qualifications as well as domestic ability.  A lady of fine conversational talent, sociable and agreeable, she is closely allied with the Christian Church of which she is a consistent member. She is the mother of two daughters, Lola M, born May 8, 1889, and Ruby born June 27,1891.  Mr. Pence held the office of Postmaster for two years under President Cleveland's administration which position he filled in a trustworthy manner.  He is an energetic Democrat and was prominently identified with the conventions during the last presidential campaign.  Socially, he is one of those gentlemen always ready to make everybody happy, and at his home a stranger as well as his friends finds a ready welcome. -  Portrait & Biographical Record of Montgomery, Parke & Fountain Counties, Indiana, Page 319 - shared by Karen Zach

PENNEWILL, D. H. ., Superintendent of the Rockville Graded Schools was born near Baltimore, MD June 14, 1835.  At the age of a few months, his parents moved to Indiana, settling at Aurora, on the Ohio  River.  Here the subj.  Of this sketch was brought up and received his early education.  In 1847, his parents moved to Moore's Hill, Dearborn County, IN where his mother still resides.  He was then 12 years of age, and his ambition at that time was to become a merchant.  He accordingly entered a dry goods store at a salary of 50 dollars a year, with the privilege of going to school during the winter months.  In this way he continued for 18 months, studying diligently, meanwhile.  At the age of 17 he was prevailed upon to take charge of the primary department of the public schools of that place, which he did, finding in the exercise that scope for the study of human nature, and that love for teaching which awakened in him a determination to pursue the profession.  The following year he became principal of the school, and the year after went to Lawrenceburg and entered the schools there, first as subordinate teacher and then as principal, remaining there for 6 consecutive years.  Meantime a college had been established at Moore's Hill, his former place of residence, and he was called to take the v. Presidency of the same, where he remained till 1862, when the war being in progress his patriotism got the better of him and he enlisted.  Having as a teacher, become accustomed to discipline and order, he preferred the regular army and accordingly enlisted in the 11th Infantry as a high private.  He was immediately detailed to Indianapolis as a recruiting officer, with the rank of lt.  This position again imposed upon him the necessity of study, as often in former situations, which he cheerfully accepted, in order to fulfill his duties in a manner acceptable to himself.  He recruited and drilled men so effectively that on their delivery at Ft. Independence, in Boston harbor, they were considered fit to enter the ranks of the regular army.  The close of the war left him in Cincinnati, where he had been detached as assistant paymaster.  He at once applied in Cincinnati for a position in his old profession and was accepted, taking the place of principal in one of the city schools, which he held for four consecutive years.  His health failing, he rested from teaching one year at his old home in Moore's Hill.  He then entered the Edinburgh public schools as superintendent, taking the place of Prof. J. H.  Martin, who had been called to the presidency of Moore's Hill College, where he remained two years when he received an earnest and pressing invitation to come to Rockville and take the superintendence of the public schools.  Under his admin. The schools have had more than their accustomed prosperity.  Mr. Pennewill is emphatically a self-made man, and is all the better as a teacher on that account.  He has learned self-discipline and independent study and therefore knows how to initiate his pupils into the same valuable experience.  Mr. Pennewill was married in 1865 to Miss Fannie Wood, daughter Rev. E. G.  Wood, one of the oldest minister of the Methodist Church in Indiana by whom he has one child.  As a teacher, he pursues in everything a scientific and systematic method, having thought out and matured his own plans. He has arranged a complete course of study on this plan for graded schools, with a syllabus for each grade for the use of teachers, and in all the branches taught in the high schools has made himself thoroughly proficient.  (taken from the 1874 Parke Co In Atlas, p 28)

Benjamin PHILLIPS for over 30 years has been a resident on his farm of 420 acres situated on Section 5, Wabash Township, Parke County.  He has made a success of agricultural pursuits and at one time was owner of 650 acres but has disposed of a portion of this, having given his children 230 acres and some money.  He has fed live stock and dealt extensively in it all his life, having been quite successful in that line.  Mr. Phillips was born October16, 1829 in Fauquier Co VA being a son of William and Harriet Robison Phillips.  Jenkins Phillips, of Virginia the grandfather of our subject followed the occupation of an agriculturist in the Old Dominion.  His son, William who was born in the same state was a farmer and slave owner.  In 1833 he went to Coshocton County Ohio and in 1835 came to Reserve Township Indiana where he resided until his death. He purchased and improved about 220 acres where he died March 14, 1882.  William Phillips was born August 27, 1797 was a Hard shell Baptist and strong Democrat.  His wife, who survived him until November 6, 1886, was born in Virginia September 15, 1804 and was the mother of 10 children, all but two of whom lived to mature years.  They are as follows: Albert who died in Iowa; Rachel, Mrs. Henry Milligan who died in the same state; Nancy, wife of William Hawkins of Illinois; Jenkins, a resident of the Hawkeye State (Iowa); Benjamin; William; Alpheus of Illinois; Randolph and two who died in childhood.  The mother was for half a century devoted and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Benjamin Phillips came to Indiana with his parents and received only limited common school advantages.  At the age of 20 he left home, starting in business for himself and in 1852 settled on 7 acres of land on Section 2, Wabash Township which belonged to his wife. This he engaged in cultivating for seven years, about 1860 locating on his present farm which has been his home continuously until the present time with the exception of two years spent in Montezuma. He owns 420 acres of valuable and desirable land which is well kept and a model farm of this decade.  Mr. Phillips has been twice married, his first union being with Jane, daughter of William and Mary BATEMAN MORGAN.  Four children blessed their home, 3 living: Nelson G; Samuel B and Warner. The wife and mother who was born April 29, 1829 was called to her final abode January 21, 1864.  The present wife of our subject was before her marriage Julia, widow of Smith DUNLAP and daughter of John and Barbara NEWMAN, of Pennsylvania Dutch descent.  The father was one of the pioneers of this county and Minister of the united Brethren Church.  Of the 4 children born to Mr. and Mrs. Phillips, 3 are living: George of California; Nettie, wife of Charles Mathews of Illinois and Annie.  Mrs. Phillips had two children by her first marriage: James H. and David B.  Our worthy subject and wife are faithful members of the United Brethren Church. The former is a member of the Ancient Free & Accepted Masons and has the respect and friendship of all who know him. - Portrait & Biographical Record of Montgomery, Parke & Fountain Counties, Indiana. Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1893, Page 351

PHILLIPS, James, farmer and miller, Section 19; P. O. Rose Hill born  in Ohio March 15, 1836; when a child he, with his parents moved to Parke County, Indiana 1837; there he was raised on a farm and remained most of the time until 1875 when he moved to where he now resides, and now owns 40 acres of land; in 1862 he enlisted in Company H 21st Indiana Volunteer Infantry; he served 3 years and was in the battles of Organza Bend, Ole River, Ft. Morgan, Baton Rouge and others; in the battle of Baton Rouge he was wounded by a gun-shot in the left side and was mustered out at the expiration of his term; October 30, 1855 he married Miss Rebecca I. Musgrove, a native of Park (sic) County, Indiana; they have 5 children: Martha E, now Mrs. Wymer; Ulysses L, Carlton, Ohio; John F; Melvin M and Rufus W, are members of the ME Church and Mr. P. (sic) belongs to the IOOF Waveland Lodge, No. 19, Indiana. - The History of Keokuk County, Iowa : Evansville, Ind.: Unigraphic, 1975, Page 720

PHILLIPS, William, farmer, Montezuma, was born in Fauquier County, VIRGINIA August 27, 1798.  In 1821, he was married to Miss Harriet ROBINSON, who was born in Fauquier County, Virginia in 1804.  In 1836 they removed to Parke County, IN, and settled in Reserve Township, on the farm where they now live.  They have had a family of 9 children, of whom six are living: Nancy, wife of W. HAWKINS; Jenkins; Benjamin; William ; Alphus and Randolph.  Mr. Phillips has been one of the successful farmers of Parke Co.  He has secured a good home for each of his children and has plenty left for himself.  He has been honest in all his dealings, and is a good old Jackson Democrat.   (Beadle, J. H.   1880 History of Parke County, Indiana (from Historic notes on the Wabash Valley and History of Vigo County) Chicago: H. H. Hill & N. Iddings, Publishers reprinted 1977 by The Bookmark, Knightstown IN).

 

PHILLIPS, William O. farmer, Judson, was born in Ohio  in 1819 and is the son of Andrew and Elizabeth BARR Phillips.  His father was a native of Ireland and emigrated to America with his parents when 3 years old and settled in Pa.  He served as a soldier in the war of 1812, and fought in the battles of Chippeway and Lundy's Lane. When the war was over he went to Steubenville, Ohio , where he was married and came to Indiana in 1829, remaining 4 years and returned to Ohio  where he died.  WO Phillips came to Parke Co Indiana in 1841.  In 1848 he was married to Martha L. CLARK, daughter of Eli and America NANTZ Clark, who came to Parke Co from TN in 1830.  By this marriage he has 7 children: Abigail P; Mary M. Married to James S.  DANIELS; Eli A; Louis S; Ellsworth and Charlie.  Mr. Phillips followed school teaching for several years after he came to IN.  He stood in a store as clerk for 4 years, and sold good for 15 years.  He was elected 3 times justice of the peace in Greene Township; he served two terms and refused the office at the last election.  He was appointed postmaster in Parkeville in 1862 which office he retained till 1864 when he moved to Judson.  He was census enumerator of his township in 1880.  He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church at Judson. Though he came to Parke Co poor, by his good management he is now the possessor of a good farm of 205 acres under good cultivation and fairly stocked.  (Taken from: The 1880 History of Parke County, Indiana.  J. H.  Beadle.   Chicago: H. H. Hill)

 

PICKARD, Isaac A., farmer, Martintown, IL is now in Il actively engaged in farming and therefore Martintown Township, Iroquois County, can boast of owning as a citizen one of Parke County's industrious sons.  He was born in Sugar Creek Township, Parke Co October11, 1845 and is the son of Isaac W. and Sallie (EPHLIN) Pickard.  His youth was spent on the farm, engaged in all the duties of backwoods boy, part of which was going to mill with grist on horseback.  He also attended school as far as was possible while home, but attended a graded school after he returned from the war.  In June, 1863, he enlisted in Co. A 85th Ind. Vol. Inf.  He was in the battles of Resaca, Peach Tree Creek and many others, and was with Sherman on his memorable march to the sea, a large part of the time detailed as forager.  On July 21, 1865 he was honorably discharged and returned home; took charge of the old farm and followed farming 4 years.  He then sold out his farm, having previously bought out the heirs, and engaged in carpentering, attending graded school and the livery business, till April 17, 1873, when he was appointed and sworn in as Dept. Sheriff of Parke County, Indiana, in which capacity he served two years, faithfully performing the duties of that office.  January 2, 1876 he married Miss Josie, daughter of Hiram G and Indiana (LAVERTY) BROCKWAY.  She was born in Parke County, Wabash Township, September24, 1852, but soon after went with her parents to Iroquois County, IL.  Her father died soon after settling in that county and her mother is still living, and is in possession of a very remarkable memory, and from her was gathered much of the history of Wabash Township.  Immediately after Mr. Pickard's marriage he removed to Iroquois co.  He was two children: Alvis B, born December8, 1876 and Gloria May, born October4, 1878.  Politically, Mr. Pickard is a republican.  he is also a member of the Masonic Fraternity. - Unknown Source

Benjamin F. PITMAN. Among the progressive and enterprising farmers of Wabash Township, Parke County is the subject of this sketch who was born in the western part of Adams Township, of this county November 17, 1853.  His parents were Thomas and Agnes WISHARD Pitman.  Grandfather Benjamin Pitman was the son of Joseph who was of German origin and a resident of PA when his death occurred.  Benjamin Pitman was born in the Keystone state and removed to Knox Co Oh about 1812. He then removed to Michigan where he made his home until 1833, when he made a settlement in Adams Township, Parke Co.  The opening year of the war he went to Iowa where he died shortly after in his 83rd year. Religiously he was a member of the Free Will Baptist Church and politically a Democrat.  He was 3 times married; his first wife, Sarah Stephens was born in Pennsylvania and died in Ohio; after which Mr. Pitman wedded Jemima, widow of Mr. Swift to whom were born 3 daughters.  The mother died in Michigan. The third wife, Mrs. Polly James (nee Whittaker) was called from life in Iowa. Thomas Pitman, our subject's father was born in Pennsylvania April 27, 1811 and was given common school privileges. In 1831 he came on horseback to Indiana, locating in Vermillion County where he worked out for a time by the month.  In Oct 1836, he settled on 80 acres of land belonging to his wife in Adams Township.  To this as a nucleus he continually added adjoining land, until his farm comprised 370 acres which he and his sons cleared and otherwise improved. He was a leading agriculturist, one who was held in the highest respect for his worthy qualities as a man and neighbor. He cast his ballot in favor of the Democratic nominees and was ever found on the side of progress and advancement.  His death occurred Dec 9, 1888.  Mrs. Pitman was born October 4, 1812 in Nicholas County, Kentucky her parents being Samuel and Margaret (Oliver) Wishard natives of Red Stone, Pa and Lexington KY.  The former, who was a farmer by occupation removed with his parents who were natives of Ireland to Kentucky. In 1830 he came in a wagon to Vermillion County, Indiana where he entered and improved 320 acres of land.  In his 84th year in September 1857 he departed life. His wife survived him a number of years, dying April 6, 1873, having attained the extreme old age of 93 years as she was born in Ohio in 1780. Benjamin F. Pitman  is one of 11 children: Abendego; Samuel who died at age 32; William who enlisted in the 11th Indiana and was killed in the battle of Champion Hills; Margaret, Mrs. William Cook of Kansas; Thomas, of Bourbon County Kansas; who served in the 85th Indiana as Corp; Jane, Mrs. G. W. Payton of Kansas; Sarah, who died at age 22; Mary A and Susan A (twins) whose death occurred at age 23; Rebecca, deceased wife of Franklin Bell and our subject.  After receiving a district school education Benjamin Pitman started out to make his own way and when but little past his majority rented the old homestead. In November 1883, he purchased 80 acres on Section 9, Wabash Township and also owns 50 acres of the old home farm.  On September 24, 1876 occurred his marriage with Mary E. Cox who was born in Adams Township, July 29, 1858 and is a daughter of Wesley and Elizabeth Evans Cox natives of NC and Indiana, respectively. The former was an early and respected settler of Parke Co, where he owned and carried on a farm.  He died January 1880, aged 70 years and 7 years later his wife passed away at age 68. They were both members of the Christian Church and passed their latter years at the home of Mr. Pitman. In his political faith the father was a Republican.  Mrs. Pitman is one of 14 children. James served in the war, enlisting in Tuscola, Indiana; William; Albert and John were in service during the civil conflict. The remainder were: Alexander; Barton; Arestus; Fred; Lillie who died at age 9; Emily (deceased was the wife of B. Young; Lovisa (deceased) wife of F. Wright; Mary and two who died in childhood.  Our subject and wife had 4 children: Fred D; Benjamin E; Love, who died at age 6 and Claude W.  Mrs. Pitman has been a member of the Christian Church for 14 years and like her husband has the friendship and good will of all who have come in contact with her. - Portrait & Biographical Record of Montgomery, Parke & Fountain Counties, Indiana. Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1893, Page 347

 

PORTER, D.A. , farmer, Annapolis, was born in Ontario County, NY in 1829.  At sixteen years of age he went to Marysville, Kentucky, where he served an apprenticeship at the carriage carriage-maker's trade, which he completed at 19 years of age.  He then worked in different parts of the country.  In 1853, he came to LaPorte, Indiana, where he worked at his trade about two years, and in 1855 he came to Annapolis, where he carried on business until the breaking out of the rebellion.  In August, 1861, he recruited forty men for the 9th Indiana Battalion, of which he was elected second lieutenant, and after serving about one year he was promoted to first lt.  He took part in the battle of Pittsburgh landing and a great many others.  He was always at his post in action, and never shrank from the duties devolving upon him as an officer.  On account of the absence of the captain all the duties of that office fell upon Mr. Porter.  In 1863, he was unfortunate in having his leg broken by the fall  of his horse, and after remaining in the hospital for some time he received a furlough and came home.  He, however, rejoined his battery at Moscow, but not being able for duty soon after resigned and returned to Annapolis, and in the fall of 1863 helped to organize Co F, 11th Ind. Cavalry  He was elected captain of the company.  He served until December 1864, when he resigned and returned to Annapolis, where he has since resided.  He is a member of the AF & AM and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and has been a constant member of the Methodist Episcopal church for many years.  Taken from: Page304 History of Parke Co IN; J. H.  Beadle, Chicago: H. H. Hill, 1880

 

PRICE, G. C. ., minister, Catlin, was born in Pulaski county Kentucky on December6, 1819, and is the on of Shadrach and Nancy Price, both born in Virginia  His grandfather, an Englishman, served 7 years in the revolution and saw Cornwallis stack his arms at Yorktown.  Is grandmother Price was Irish.  His father experienced the war of 1812 for a time, then hired a substitute. Mr. P, with his parents, immigrated to Indiana and settled on a large farm in Monroe Co.  His father died in 1862 and his mother in 1871.  Both are bur. At Hardensville, Crawford County, IL.  Mr. Price was educated at State University, Bloomington, Indiana entered the ministry in 1845 and besides preaching has farmed about 15 years.  He engaged in the mercantile business 5 years and exclusive ministerial labor 15 years.  During the Civil War he suffered severely from a band of 21 guerrillas, losing both money on hand and goods from his storeroom.  He has been a radical republican during the life of that party and consequently was closely criticized and malignantly treated by southern robbers during that struggle.  The Whig principles taught by his father were deeply implanted in his mind.  For six years he was Capt. Of a militia co. In Owen Co , IN; has been township trustee two terms.  He is now giving all his time tot he service of the church, filling four appointments.  He is hale and hearty and able to preach constantly in his adopted faith the Christian Church.  In 1841 he was married to Mary Ann GRAY of Monroe County, IN.  They have had six children: Harriet; Dr. William S, of Brazil, Clay County, Indiana; who is a graduate of Merom (Indiana) College and also of Louisville, Kentucky. Med. College; David, deceased; Madison A, of Greene County, In; James, deceased and Pleasant O, of Brazil.   - Unknown Source

Alexander PUETT.  To this gentleman belongs the distinction of being the oldest surviving settler of Rockville.  When he came to this now flourishing city its first house was building, a tavern erected by a man named Ray.  Since that early day he has witnessed many marvelous changes in the surroundings, has seen the hut of the frontiersman give way to the comfortable residence of the farmer and the merchant and has himself contributed to no small extent to secure the wonderful transformation that has been wrought.  A native of North Carolina, Mr. Puett was born in Burke County January 15, 1809.  His father, Coleman Puett, was a farmer in that state and during the War of 1812 was detailed to convey provisions to the army of Gen. Jackson which he did, hauling the supplies across the country to the soldiers. About 1814 he removed to Monroe County Indiana where he entered a tract of Government land and was one of the earliest settlers of that section of the state.  Later he came to Parke County where he cleared several 80-acre tracts and remained until his death in 1833.  After improving his first purchase he traded the property for the place now occupied by the subject of our sketch.  Alexander Puett was 5 when he accompanied his father to Indiana where he passed his boyhood in Monroe County.  At one time, when he and his sister were quite small, they went out, as usual to drive the cows home and in the woods began to play blindfolding each other and wandering around in childish sport until they were a long way from home.  As they could not make the cows go along the road they wished to take, the children left the cattle and wandered off to a creek where they saw 3 Indians.  Realizing that they were lost, Alexander wanted to go to the red men, but his sister being afraid refused so they crouched down among the leaves, where they remained hidden until the savages had passed by.  They then traveled for some distance along a road and finally reached an old hollow log where they decided to remain until morning, but hearing the sound of some one chopping they went tot he barn which they found to be that of a pioneer preacher. T he latter took the children home on horseback, reaching there about daybreak and finding the other members of the family in the deepest anxiety over the absence of the little ones.  About 1824 Mr. Puett came to Parke County where he grew to manhood receiving his education principally in the Quaker schools of the home neighborhood.  In 1843 he married Miss Minerva Strain and unto them were b. 4 children 3 living: Charlotte, wife of Wm. Overman; Lucy, who married A. C. Bates and Welby (note: Shelby) a farmer residing in Parke County.  After his marriage Mr. Puett located on the farm where he now resides and through strenuous exertions brought 160 acres to a high state of improvement.  For 12 years he lived in a hewed log house 18 x 24 feet after which he resided in a brick residence until 1860 and then tore down that structure erecting the house which still stands.  His first wife died about 16 years after marriage and in 1850 (sic - only equals 7) he was united to Miss Margaret E. Allen who after the death of her father, William Allen of Kentucky, accompanied her widowed mother in 1833 to Indiana and located 9 miles north of Rockville.  Mr. Puett has been extensively engaged in buying and shipping stock and while thus engaged made a number of trips to Milwaukee and Madison Wisconsin as well as to various southern points.  For about 5 years he carried on a mercantile business in Rockville.  He is now the owner of 260 acres where he makes his home.  At one time he owned 640 acres but has divided the property among his children.  Politically he has always been in active sympathy with Democrats and has served as Constable for several terms.  His reminiscences of the early history of this section of the country are most interesting and he is an entertaining conservationist.  He is one of the few now surviving who were present at the treaty made by Gen Cass with Indians at old Fort Dearborn in 1838 about 7000 Indians "smoked the pipe of peace with the pale face."  - Portrait & Biographical Record of Montgomery, Parke & Fountain Counties, Indiana.  Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1893, Page 545

PRUETT, Alexander, farmer, Rockville, the youngest son of Coleman and Judy (MOORE) Puett, was born in Burke County, NC January 15, 1809.  In 1815 his parents removed to Monroe County, IN and in March 1825 to Parke settled 3 mi. NW of Rockville.  Three years afterward Mr. Puett made his residence where he now lives, on the outer limits of the corporation.  He is one of the very few early settlers of Parke Co now living; and his memory of remote occurrences is quite distinct and vivid.  We are indebted to him for some notes of information which appear in the township history, and which were not accessible elsewhere.  Mr. P. Was married August 20,1 834 to Minerva STRAIN.  By this wife he had 4 children: Mary Jane, who became the wife of John ALLEN and died September 9, 1871; Charlotte relict of Harvey LOWRY; Shelby C and Lucy Minerva, wife of William OVERMAN.  Mrs. Puett died May 30, 1848 and on November 12, 1850, Mr. Puett celebrated his second married with Miss Margaret Ellen, a cousin to the Rev. William Y. Allen.  She was born December22, 1822 near Shelbyville, Kentucky and came with her widowed mother to Parke Co in 1828.  She has been a member of the Presbyterian Church since 1838.  Mr. P. Has always confined himself to farming and raising and dealing in stock, in which he has done a successful business.  He owned at one time 1,000 acres of land, but has now divided the larger part of it among his children.  He retains 130 acres adjoining Rockville, the estimated value of which is $13,000 and 160 acres on the Little Raccoon, valued at $5,000.  Mr. P. Has always belonged to that honored school of politics known as Jackson democracy and he signalized his devotion to this political faith by casting his first vote for "Old Hickory" - Unknown Source

 

PRUETT, Michael and Elizabeth came to seek their fortune, hailing from the Blue Grass state, bring their son Calvin with them.  They bought land not far NE of Mansfield.  Mr. Pruett lived here till 1864 when he moved to Putnam Co where he now resides.  His sons, Calvin Cyrenus and James and other children have spent their lives tilling the soil in this township.  When the public school law was first presented to the public, and subjected to the ballot, Calvin was radically in favor of the new law and was the only man in Jackson to vote for it.  The people hooted him for his seeming folly; but Calvin stood, though alone, for a principle which he saw must ultimately become established.  He openly hoped that the day would come when there would be a law requiring a school in each district supported by direct taxation, and predicted this would come to pass within his lifetime.  At the next election, at which this school question was made an issue, Calvin had 2 or 3 supporters and in a few years saw his hopes realized.  Cyrenus Pruett has been active for many years in an official career, having been township assessor about 13 years and was elected co. assessor.  James Pruett faced fire and ball in the Civil War and spent 52 days in Andersonville Prison.  Taken from: The 1880 History of Parke County, Indiana.  J. H.  Beadle.   Chicago: H. H. Hill

 

PUETT, Austin M.  -- among the earliest settlers who attained to prominence was Austin M. Puett, who died a year or two since.  He was a man of very decided character and his life was checkered with stirring scenes.  He filled various stations of public responsibility -- sheriff, treasurer, canal trustee and state senator.  - Unknown Source

Samuel D. PUETT.  The legal firm of Puett & Adams, of which the subject of this sketch is the senior member, is one of the most prominent, not only in Rockville but also throughout this state where they conduct an extensive and lucrative general practice in all the courts.  In the majority of the most important cases ever brought into the courts of Parke County, their names have appeared and they have been successful, almost invariably, in gaining the suit.  Samuel D. Puett was born on a farm located five miles east of Rockville, March 22, 1846.   He is a member of the family whose representatives for several generations have been identified with the development of Parke County.  His father, Johnson Puett, and grandfather, Colman Puett, were numbered among the very earliest settlers of Indiana; whither they migrated from North Carolina about the year 1820 and first made settlement in Monroe County.  By occupation Johnson Puett was a farmer and he was very successful in his undertakings, accumulating property, until at one time he was the owner of about 700 acres.  His death occurred at the old homestead in Parke County in 1891, when he had attained the good old age of 84.  His wife, Patsy Puett, still survives.  At the old Parke County homestead, the subject of this union was reared to a sturdy manhood, meanwhile receiving the advantages of the district schools.  Afterward he attended Rockville schools and later entered the Bloomingdale Academy, after which for one year he was a student in the State University of Indiana at Bloomington.  In 1870, he entered Asbury (now DePauw) University, from which institution he was graduated.  His literary education completed, he commenced the study of law, for he had resolved upon following that profession.  At Rockville he entered the law office of Judge S.F. Maxwell and was soon afterward admitted to practice law at the bar of the state.  In the spring of 1871, Mr. Puett formed a partnership with Judge Maxwell, which continued until the death of the judge in 1877.  Afterward our subject conducted his practice alone until 1883, when he formed a partnership with Hiram E. Hadley, under the firm title of Puett & Hadley.  Upon the removal of Mr. Hadley to Washington in 1889, the connection was dissolved and 3 years later, in 1892, the firm of Puett & Adams was established, the junior member being Albert N. Adams, a lawyer of keen discrimination and thorough knowledge of the profession.  In his political preferences, Mr. Puett is a Democrat, loyal to the platform and principles of his party and a zealous advocate of its candidates.  In 1876 he served as Presidential Elector and in 1888 he was Elector of the 8th District.  His interest in educational matters has been unflagging and he has done not a little to promote the standard of education and advance the grade of scholarship.  For six years he held the office of School Trustee in Rockville and at the present time is President of the Board of Education in that city.  The marriage of Mr. Puett in 1873 united him with Miss Mamie, E, daughter of the late Judge MAXWELL and one child has blessed their union S.F. Maxwell.  Socially, Mr. Puett is identified with Knights of Pythias and Masonic order.  In his religious connections he is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and is a generous contributor to the cause of religion.  While his attention is principally devoted to the duties of his profession, he by no means remains indifferent to the progress of the community and the growth of the city, but in every way he strives to secure the advancement of those measures calculated to facilitate the growth of Rockville and increase the comfort of the citizens. - Portrait & Biographical Record of Montgomery, Parke & Fountain County, Indiana.  Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1893. Page121 

 

PUETT, Samuel Duncan -- a prominent attorney of Parke County, residing at Rockville, was born in Adams Township, March 22, 1846.  His parents, Johnson and Patsy (NOEL) Puett, were among the earliest settlers in Parke County, having come to these parts in 1825.  Mr. P. Spent his early days working on his father's farm.  He was a young man of much activity and enterprise, and understanding the importance of education resolved to improve his advantages for obtaining it.  Having spent one year at the Bloomingdale Academy, his eyes became affected and he was forced to suspend study.  In 1867 he resumed his studies, attending the Univ. At Bloomington nearly a year.  Near the close of the same year he matriculated at the Asbury Univ. At Greencastle, and graduated in the scientific course 1870.  He immediately entered the law office of Judge Samuel F. MAXWELL, to prepare himself for the profession.  In February 1871, he was taken as partner, with one-fourth interest; the next year he was given one third, and the following year made an equal partner .  The partnership continued until the death of Judge Maxwell in June 1877.  Mr. P. Was married May 13, 1873, to Miss Mamie E. Maxwell, eldest daughter Of Judge Maxwell  She was born June 25, 1850.   They have one son, Samuel M, born August 3, 1879.  During the past 8 or 10 years Mr. P. Has been prominent in the politics of the county; he has been a member of the democratic county committee, and is at present chairman of that organization.  In 1858, he united with the Methodist church and has been a trustee the last 8 years.  He belongs to the K. Of P.  Mr. P. Owns two farms, described as follows: E 1/2 SE 1/4 Section26 and N 1/2 NE 1/4 Section35 T 15, R7 160 acres; and NE 1/4 NE 1/4 Section34 and 60 acres off SO. End E. 1/2 SE 1/4 Section27 T 17 Range 8 100 acres.  Mr. P. Has accumulated this property by his own unaided exertions since 1870.  He also owns a tract of 80 acres near Des Moines, Iowa presented him by his father.   - Unknown Source

 

PULLIAM, Harman A. is one of the honored early settlers of Green Township, Parke County, having purchased the place which he still owns November8, 1849.  This farm is located on Sec. 28 and for the 80 acres tract which he then purchased, and which was in a perfectly wild state.  Mr. Pulliam paid $575 buying it second-hand.  He put up a small house and with characteristic zeal undertook to develop the place.  He has succeeded admirably and now has his 135 acres under good cultivation.  He raises grain largely, and aims to keep a good variety of stock of all kinds on hand.  Garrard County, Kentucky was the place where our subject first opened his eyes to the light of day, that event taking place in march, 1823.  His father, Harman Pulliam, was born in Virginia, and emigrated to Garrard County Kentucky at an early day.  He was, however, reared in Hanover, Virginia and there married Keziah GLOVER, by whom he had 10 children, our subject being next to youngest.  Of this large family only one other is now living, Keziah, a resident of Iowa.  The mother died when our subject was merely an infant.  Harman Pulliam, Sr. was a farmer by occupation and in the War of 1812.  When our subject was only 5 his father came to Indiana, settling in Ripley County for one year, whence, at the age of 10, Harman A. came to Parke County with his eldest brother, William, and lived with him for six years, when he started out to make his own way in the world.  For one year he worked for Nathaniel STEELE in Washington Township, and afterward worked around by the month until he was married.  His first wife was Miss Sally Ann BURKS, their union being celebrated in 1843.  She was the daughter of Thomas Burks and was called untimely from this life, only 6 months after her marriage.  Again, in the year, 1847, Mr. Pulliam was married, this time to Elizabeth, daughter of Jesse McLain, who was one of the old settlers of this county, coming here from Shelby County, Kentucky, about the year 1852 (sic).  Mrs. Pulliam is a native of Kentucky, and was not quite 3 when her parents brought her to Parke County.  For six years after his marriage, Mr. Pulliam rented land one miles east of where he now lives, after which he settled on a farm a mile SE of here, which he carried on for one year.  Four years previous to this, however, he had purchased his present homestead, and since that venture his business career has been marked with success.  8 children came to bless the hearthstone of our subject, six of whom are yet surviving.  They are: Mary Jane; John T, a farmer of Montgomery County, Indiana; Sarah Ann, widow of William McClain; Jesse, who lives on a portion of his father's farm; George and Alfred, a farmer of Adams Township.  Laura died when 3 and Matilda wife of E. PITTS departed this life when 32 years of age, leaving two children, who live at the home of our subject.  In regard to politics, Mr. Pulliam uses his influence and casts his ballot in favor of the Democratic party.  By his upright and honorable career as a business man and citizen he has won the sincere respect and esteem of his fellow citizens.  It is always his endeavor to advance in every possible way the public good and this cannot be too highly commended, as it is only the narrow-minded man who makes his chief object the acquisition of wealth, regardless of the rights and feelings of others. Portrait & Biographical Record of Montgomery, Parke & Fountain Counties, Indiana, p 221 - (Chapman Brothers, 1893)

 

PUNTENNEY, John G., farmer and stock raiser, Armiesburg, was born in Parke Co. December14, 1834 and is a son of Aquilla and Eleanor (HEADLEY) Puntenney, who came from Ohio  to what is now Wabash Township away back in 1818 and were the very earliest pioneers here, settling, as they did, the farthest back from civilization and there lived and reared their family and accumulated  a large property.  Aquilla Puntenney served as a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in December1878, after a life of labor; and though lost to sight, to memory dear.  The subject of this sketch, reared as he was in a new country, was deprived of the advantages of the education which today is so necessary.  He however gained what knowledge he could in the backwoods pioneer school of his time, and at about the age of 18 he began for himself, working part of his father's farm on shares.  He now owns over 300 acres of land one and a half miles south of Armiesburg on the old state road.  He built himself one of the finest residences in this part of Parke Co.  Part of the farm he inherited from his father's estate.  March 11, 1875, he married Mrs. Margaret HIXON WEESE.  She is the daughter of William and Margaret Hixon, and was born March 3, 1842.  They have one child, Ethel, born July 11, 1878.   She has 4 children by her former husband.  - Historical Sketch of Parke Co., Indiana (combined Atlas) p 117

Aquila PUNTENNEY, pioneer, was born in Ohio  and came to Wabash Township in 1818, being one of the very early settlers in Parke Co. He acquired a tract of land upon which he reared a family and died on the farm in 1878. He served as a soldier in the war of 1812. His son, John G. Puntenney was born on the farm December14, 1834. - Unknown Source

PURCELL

Dr. Wallace M. PURCELL, who has been a resident of Rockville since May 1890, where he is gradually building up a good business, was born at Pleasant Garden, Putnam County, Indiana February 24, 1839. His parents, John M. and Adaline D. Freeman Purcell, were both born in Orange County this state. Both came to Putnam County at the age of 10, and later became known to each other at Pleasant Garden where they were married and reared a family of four children: Bruce R; who enlisted in Company B, 4th Iowa Infantry in 1861 and became a veteran by reenlistment. He was shot through the knee-joint while skirmishing near Dallas, George May 28, 1864 and died from the affects of the injury July 12, 1864 in a field hospital at Barton's Iron Works near Atlanta, Georgia.  Helen Marr, whose first husband, William H. Girton died in service at Columbia, Tennessee May 1862. She was afterward married to George W. Osborn, and now resides on a farm near Reelsville, Putnam County. Dove A, who became the wife of Capt. John M. Magner now of Taylorsville, Ill. While visiting her husband at the front she was caught in the battle of Corinth Miss the tent she was occupying being pierced by many bullets during the early part of the engagement. She died of acute illness 1869.  Wallace M, the oldest of the children and subject of this sketch had only the facilities afforded by the log school house for acquiring an early education.  He was fond of books, however and easily kept at the head of his classes. In March 1854 he entered the office of Dr. R. R. Stevenson as a student of medicine.  Dr. Stevenson was a Kentuckian by birth and at the outbreak of the war he threw up a lucrative practice, went south and joined fortunes with the Confederates. He became Quartermaster at Andersonville and at the close of the war was indicted along with Wirtz and others for inhumane treatment of prisoners. He escaped punishment however and later on he gained considerable reputation by writing a book entitled The Other Side which had an extensive circulation in the Southern States. Dr. Purcell took his first course of lectures in 1856-57 at Keokus, Iowa. In 1860-62 he was in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania graduating with honor at Jefferson Medical College of that city in March 1862. He immediately entered the US service as acting assistant surgeon in General Hospital at Mound City, Illinois. In 1863 he went to the Hospital at York, Pennsylvania where he remained until 1864 when he returned to civil practice to which he had since devoted his entire time and attention. To the performance of his duties, he has brought a clear head, analytical abilities of the highest order, and a determination to do that which is right in the profession and never betray a confidence that has been intrusted to his keeping.  Manfully, and tenderly, he has stood up to his ideal of what a general practitioner of medicine and surgery ought to be.  Many calls for his help from distant parts of Indiana, Illinois and other states give testimony to his high standing in the profession and justifies the assertion that now at age 54, with ripe judgment and ample experience; he ranks high among the most distinguished physicians of Indiana.  He is not a specialist in any sense of the term, but thinks that the title of "Doctor" is the highest the medical man may aspire to and that the practice of medicine is the noblest calling a man can engage in.  He believes that the highest degree of knowledge attainable upon any subject, medical or otherwise, must always be associated with a high degree of mental acuteness, in the individual attaining it.  He therefore concludes that nine out of ten of the so-called specialists are selfish advertisers and quacks of ordinary ability and totally unable by reason of mental incapacity to ever acquire preeminent qualifications in any field of human thought whatever.  To the young practitioner he would say, give special study to each case submitted to your care; strive earnestly and faithfully to understand it; strive as if you thought that there was no other help but your help, and if the proper stuff is in you, there will grow up in your heart, courage, truthfulness, tenderness, benevolence and all the nobler traits of human character. The fruits of victory will be strewn along your pathway and you will know that you have not lived in vain.  The Dr. is a man of extensive reading and respectable literary attainments and has the faculty of expressing himself clearly and forcibly upon paper. During his career, he had collected a fine library but unfortunately the major part of it was destroyed by fire in September 1890.  He still has however, a choice collection of books, many of them being extremely rare and valuable.  Politically, he is a Republican. He thinks, however that voting is the highest act of citizenship and that in the exercise of that privilege, the voter who does not endorse the best candidate attainable, does not property discharge the duty he owes to society and the state. November 8, 1871 he removed an ovarian tumor weight 32 pounds from Miss Rachel E. Wigginton at Prairieton, Vigo County Indiana.  The results of this operation from a professional point of view were entirely satisfactory. Socially however the affair terminated in a manner quite unusual in such cases. The young lady in blooming health was altogether a different being from what she had been in mortal sickness and the physical shortly afterward found his professional interest in the case, giving away to friendly interest in the individual. Then followed the happy days we never forget which finally culminated in a wedding at Terre Haute, Indiana January 1, 1873. Mrs. Purcell was born in Mt. Washington Kentucky September 28, 1845. Her parents, William and Nancy Wiggington were natives of Virginia.  She is a lady of domestic tastes and habits and is devotedly fond of her children whose names with date of birth: Pocahontas, December 27, 1873; Nellie Decker April 16, 1875; Charles Frances, April 12, 1877; Mara Rosa, May 29, 1880; Leta Ruby August 1, 1882; Bertha Ellen July 4, 1844 and Benjamin Harrison August 13, 1887.  - History of Parke, Fountain & Montgomery Counties, Indiana. Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1893, Page 555.